Back in 2003 I wrote an essay on the dreaded syndrome of Windows rot. As fate would have it, I am still using that same machine, and it’s been quite stable since then. In a year or so, we’ll start hearing opinions about the relative rot-resistance of Vista versus XPSP2. But meanwhile, I’m plagued by a different syndrome: PowerBook rot.

Both of my PowerBooks are afflicted. About six months ago, my 2001-era Titanium G4 began to suffer sporadic WiFi signal loss along with the kinds of narcolepsy and spontaneous shutdowns that many new Intel Macs have exhibited. I’ve tried all the obvious things, including reseating the Airport card and resetting the NVRAM and PMU, but to no avail. The WiFi is negotiable, I could try a different card or just use the machine at home on a wired LAN, but if I can’t fix the worsening narcolepsy and shutdowns it’s all over. Something’s gone funky on the motherboard, I guess, and this machine’s too old and beat up to justify replacing it.

Then, a couple of weeks ago, my 2005-era G4 caught the spontaneous shutdown bug. I wondered if it might be protesting my new job, but when I noticed half my RAM was missing, I diagnosed lower memory slot failure. So now that machine is away having its motherboard replaced, a procedure that appears to be suspiciously routine for my local Apple store.

It’s always dangerous to extrapolate from anecdotal experience, and there’s never good data on this kind of thing, but I must say that while researching these problems I’ve seen a lot of bitching about PowerBooks. Is it just me, or are these things not built to last?