Sean McCown is a professional database administrator who writes the Database Underground blog for InfoWorld. Lately his postings have been full of references to videos. One day, he watched a Sysinternals training flick, combining live video with screencasting, and made immediate use of it to pinpoint and fix a problem. Another day, he made his own training screencast:

I sat down last night and made a video of the restore procedure for one of our ETL processes. It was 10mins long, and it explained everything someone would need to know to recover the process from a crash. [Database Underground: Not just a DR plan anymore]

Screencasting is poised to become a routine tool of business communication, but there are still a few hurdles to overcome. For starters, video capture isn’t as accessible as it ought to be. Second Life gets it right: there’s always a camera available, and you can turn it on at any time. Every desktop OS should work like that.

Meanwhile, I’ll reiterate some advice: Camtasia is an excellent tool for capturing screen video on Windows, but its $300 price tag covers a lot of editing and production features that you may never use if you’re capturing in stream-of-consciousness mode for purposes of documentation. In that case, the free Windows Media Encoder is perfectly adequate.

On the Mac I’d been using Snapz Pro X for short flicks, but it takes forever to save long sessions. Next time I do a long-form Mac screencast I’ll try iShowU. That’s what Peter Wayner used for his AJAX screencasts. Peter says that iShowU saves instantly. I tried the demo, and it does.

Finally, there’s the odd hack I tried here: I used the camera’s display as the Mac’s screen, and captured to tape. If the 720×480 format is appropriate for your subject — and when the focus is a single application window, it can be — this is a nice way to collect a lot of raw material without chewing up a ton of disk space.

Capture mechanics aside, I think the bigger impediment is mindset. To do what Sean did — that is, narrate and show an internal process, for internal consumption — you have to overcome the same natural reticence that makes dictation such an awkward process for those of us who haven’t formerly incorporated it into our work style. You also have to overcome the notion, which we unconsciously absorb from our entertainment-oriented culture, that video is a form of entertainment. It can be. Depending on the producer, a screencast documenting a disaster recovery scenario could be side-splittingly funny. And if the humor didn’t compromise the message, a funny version would be much more effective than a dry recitation. But even a dry recitation is way, way better than what’s typically available: nothing.