FAQ for podcast (and screencast) interviewees

I spend a lot of time recording and editing audio interviews for two shows: ITConversations and Perspectives. I also do a lot of interview-style screencasts. I’ve been meaning to write up a FAQ for interviewees, so here goes. Preparation As the interviewee, you need not prepare anything. Your life is the preparation. You might, however, … Continue reading FAQ for podcast (and screencast) interviewees

A conversation with Jean-Claude Bradley about open notebook science and the educational uses of Second Life

On this week’s ITConversations show I finally got to meet Jean-Claude Bradley, the Drexel chemistry professor who coined the phrase open notebook science and who champions the principles behind it. There were a couple of surprises for me. First, I was intrigued to learn about Jean-Claude’s vision for mechanized research. I’ve always thought of open … Continue reading A conversation with Jean-Claude Bradley about open notebook science and the educational uses of Second Life

Cluster computing, with large data, for the classroom

This week’s Perspectives is a two-parter: an interview and companion screencast on the topic of cluster computing in the classroom. The interview is with Kyril Faenov, the General Manager of the Windows HPC (high performance computing) unit, and the screencast is with Rich Ciapala, a program manager for Microsoft HPC++ Labs. The project demonstrated in … Continue reading Cluster computing, with large data, for the classroom

Perspectives, a new interview series, launches today

Today I’m launching a new Microsoft-oriented interview series called Perspectives. The show will touch on a variety of topics including robotics, digital identity, e-science, and social software. I’ll be speaking mostly with passionate Microsoft innovators, and sometimes also with key partners from academia and industry. The format is an audio podcast and a blog, where … Continue reading Perspectives, a new interview series, launches today

Tagging and foldering

A while ago I published a blog essay and screencast on the evolution from a folder-oriented to a tag-oriented metaphor for storing, organizing, and searching for digital objects. The subject of the screencast was Windows Photo Gallery, an application that lives at the intersection of those two metaphors. Since then, I’ve looked for opportunities to … Continue reading Tagging and foldering

Appreciating Common Craft’s “paperworks” sketchcasts

I am an immediate fan of Common Craft’s style of concept videos. Their explanations of how and why to use del.icio.us and Google Docs are crisp and entertaining. They convey the essence of these activities more clearly than any other visual explanations I’ve seen, including many of the screencasts I’ve made. The style is called … Continue reading Appreciating Common Craft’s “paperworks” sketchcasts

Chris Gemignani recreates a New York Times infographic in Excel

When I read this story about cancer care in the Sunday New York Times yesterday, I was struck by one particular information graphic which I thought was very nicely done: It turns out that Chris Gemignani was impressed too, and he decided to recreate the image using Excel. Here’s what he came up with: Going … Continue reading Chris Gemignani recreates a New York Times infographic in Excel

Henrik Frystyk Nielsen on the RESTful architecture of Microsoft Robotics Studio

Henrik Frystyk Nielsen used to work for the World Wide Web Consortium on some key pieces of infrastructure including the HTTP specification and libwww. He left the W3C in 1999 and now works for Microsoft where his current project is Robotics Studio, whose tagline is: “A Windows-based environment for academic, hobbyist and commercial developers to … Continue reading Henrik Frystyk Nielsen on the RESTful architecture of Microsoft Robotics Studio

First look at Resolver, an IronPython-based spreadsheet

Last month in an item about working with crime data I asked: Will there be a role for IronPython (or IronRuby) here, someday, such that you could use these languages inside Excel? That’d be very cool. Several folks suggested that I should take a look at Resolver, an IronPython-based spreadsheet that deeply unifies Pythonic object-oriented … Continue reading First look at Resolver, an IronPython-based spreadsheet

Revisiting language evolution in del.icio.us

Recently I began keeping track of interesting public data sources using the del.icio.us tag judell/publicdata, and invited others to do the same using their own del.icio.us accounts. That method sets up an interesting pattern of collaboration whereby all contributions flow up to the global bucket, tag/publicdata, but individual contributors can curate subsets of that collection … Continue reading Revisiting language evolution in del.icio.us