Translations:

Croatian

On this week’s Innovators show I got together with two of the authors of a new proposal for representing iCalendar in XML. Mike Douglass is lead developer of the Bedework Calendar System, and Steven Lees is Microsoft’s program manager for FeedSync and chair of the XML technical committee in CalConnect, the Calendaring and Scheduling Consortium.

What’s proposed is no more, but no less, than a well-defined two-way mapping between the current non-XML-based iCalendar format and an equivalent XML format. So, for example, here’s an event — the first low tide of 2009 in Myrtle Beach, SC — in iCalendar format:

BEGIN:VEVENT
SUMMARY:Low Tide 0.39 ft
DTSTART:20090101T090000Z
UID:2009.0
DTSTAMP:20080527T000001Z
END:VEVENT

And here’s the equivalent XML:

<vevent>
  <properties>
    <dtstamp>
      <date-time utc='yes'>
        <year>2008</year><month>5</month><day>27</day>
        <hour>0</hour><minute>0</minute><second>1</second>
      </date-time>
    </dtstamp>
    <dtstart>
      <date-time utc='yes'>
        <year>2009</year><month>1</month><day>1</day>
        <hour>9</hour><minute>0</minute><second>0</second>
      </date>
    </dtstart>
    <summary>
      <text>Low Tide 0.39 ft</text>
    </summary>
    <uid>
      <text>2009.0</text>
    </uid>
  </properties>
</vevent>

The mapping is quite straightforward, as you can see. At first glance, the XML version just seems verbose. So why bother? Because the iCalendar format can be tricky to read and write, either directly (using eyes and hands) or indirectly (using software). That’s especially true when, as is typical, events include longer chunks of text than you see here.

I make an analogy to the RSS ecosystem. When I published my first RSS feed a decade ago, I wrote it by hand. More specifically, I copied an existing feed as a template, and altered it using cut-and-paste. Soon afterward, I wrote the first of countless scripts that flowed data through similar templates to produce various kinds of RSS feeds.

Lots of other people did the same, and that’s part of the reason why we now have a robust network of RSS and Atom feeds that carries not only blogs, but all kinds of data packets.

Another part of the reason is the Feed Validator which, thanks to heroic efforts by Mark Pilgrim and Sam Ruby, became and remains the essential sanity check for anybody who’s whipping up an ad-hoc RSS or Atom feed.

No such ecosystem exists for iCalendar. I’ve been working hard to show why we need one, but the most compelling rationale comes from a Scott Adams essay that I quoted from in this blog entry. Dilber’s creator wrote:

I think the biggest software revolution of the future is that the calendar will be the organizing filter for most of the information flowing into your life. You think you are bombarded with too much information every day, but in reality it is just the timing of the information that is wrong. Once the calendar becomes the organizing paradigm and filter, it won’t seem as if there is so much.

If you buy that argument, then we’re going to need more than a handful of applications that can reliably create and exchange calendar data. We’ll want anyone to whip up a calendar feed as easily as anyone can now whip up an RSS/Atom feed.

We’ll also need more than a handful of parsers that can reliably read calendar feeds, so that thousands of ad-hoc applications, services, and scripts will be able consume all the new streams of time-and-date-oriented information.

I think that a standard XML representation of iCalendar will enable lots of ad-hoc producers and consumers to get into the game, and collectively bootstrap this new ecosystem. And that will enable what Scott Adams envisions.

Here’s a small but evocative example. Yesterday I started up a new instance of the elmcity aggregator for Myrtle Beach, SC. The curator, Dave Slusher, found a tide table for his location, and it offers an iCalendar feed. So the Myrtle Beach calendar for today begins like this:

Thu Jul 23 2009

WeeHours

Thu 03:07 AM Low Tide -0.58 ft (Tide Table for Myrtle Beach, SC)

Morning

Thu 06:21 AM Sunrise 6:21 AM EDT (Tide Table for Myrtle Beach, SC)
Thu 09:09 AM High Tide 5.99 ft (Tide Table for Myrtle Beach, SC)
Thu 10:00 AM Free Coffee Fridays (eventful: )
Thu 10:00 AM Summer Arts Project at The Market Common (eventful: )
Thu 10:00 AM E.B. Lewis: Story Painter (eventful: )

Imagine this kind of thing happening on the scale of the RSS/Atom feed ecosystem. The lack of an agreed-upon XML representation for iCalendar isn’t the only reason why we don’t have an equally vibrant ecosystem of calendar feeds. But it’s an impediment that can be swept away, and I hope this proposal will finally do that.